June 2023
Volume 64, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2023
Abnormal retinal apoptosis morphometry in glaucoma and optic neuritis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James Owler
    Novai Ltd, Reading, United Kingdom
  • Richard E. Daws
    Novai Ltd, Reading, United Kingdom
    Imperial College London, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Patrick Lotery
    Novai Ltd, Reading, United Kingdom
    Imperial College London, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Jonathan Young
    Novai Ltd, Reading, United Kingdom
  • Natalie Pankova
    Novai Ltd, Reading, United Kingdom
  • M Francesca Cordeiro
    Novai Ltd, Reading, United Kingdom
    University College London Institute of Ophthalmology, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   James Owler Novai Ltd, Code E (Employment); Richard Daws Novai Ltd, Code E (Employment); Patrick Lotery None; Jonathan Young Novai Ltd, Code E (Employment); Natalie Pankova Novai Ltd, Code C (Consultant/Contractor); M Francesca Cordeiro Novai Ltd, Code E (Employment), Novai Ltd, Code P (Patent)
  • Footnotes
    Support  Grant number: 10028366
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2023, Vol.64, 4676. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      James Owler, Richard E. Daws, Patrick Lotery, Jonathan Young, Natalie Pankova, M Francesca Cordeiro; Abnormal retinal apoptosis morphometry in glaucoma and optic neuritis. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2023;64(8):4676.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Novai’s detection of apoptosing retinal cells (DARC) technology allows in vivo localisation of retinal cell death (DARC ‘spots’). Stratification of DARC spots may reveal distinct mechanisms of disease. Here, we hypothesised that eyes contain multiple populations of DARC spots, and that abnormal expression of these populations is indicative of disease.

Methods : DARC NIRAF retinal imaging was conducted in healthy adults (N=36, mean age=45.97, SD=16.81) and in patients with glaucoma (N=20, mean age=61.74, SD=13.11) or multiple sclerosis (MS) optic neuritis (N=12, mean age=44.47, SD=10.82). For each DARC spot, hysteresis thresholding was applied to identify perimeters from which a set of morphometrics were extracted (e.g., spot area, eccentricity etc). Data-driven hierarchical clustering of the morphometrics generated distinct populations of DARC spots that were then compared between the healthy and patient groups with a two-way chi-square test.

Results : Hierarchical agglomerative clustering of DARC spot morphometry (Figure 1a) indicated 3 distinct DARC spot types (C0: Small regular, C1: Irregular, C2: Large regular – Figure 1b). The most common DARC spot type in each eye (Figure 1c) significantly differed between the groups (two-way chi2: 13.312, p=0.038).

Conclusions : This investigation presents evidence indicating that distinct types of DARC spots can be observed in vivo. Critically, an increased proportion of irregularly shaped DARC spots was associated with Glaucoma and MS. While this is suggestive of distinct cellular processes, we are conducting further preclinical and histological work to confirm the validity of these in vivo findings.

This abstract was presented at the 2023 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in New Orleans, LA, April 23-27, 2023.

 

Figure 1 – DARC spot morphometry differs between healthy & patient groups. a) Major vs minor DARC spot axis length labelled by hierarchically identified clusters. b) Example DARC spots types c) Proportions of most frequent DARC spot type for each group.

Figure 1 – DARC spot morphometry differs between healthy & patient groups. a) Major vs minor DARC spot axis length labelled by hierarchically identified clusters. b) Example DARC spots types c) Proportions of most frequent DARC spot type for each group.

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