June 2023
Volume 64, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2023
Microbiology Profiles and Antibiotic Susceptibility in Pediatric Infectious Keratitis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melodyanne Cheng
    University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Dalin Piseth Chea
    Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Simon SM Fung
    Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Melodyanne Cheng None; Dalin Piseth Chea None; Simon Fung None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2023, Vol.64, 2337. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Melodyanne Cheng, Dalin Piseth Chea, Simon SM Fung; Microbiology Profiles and Antibiotic Susceptibility in Pediatric Infectious Keratitis. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2023;64(8):2337.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To assess trends in microbiology profiles and antibiotics susceptibility among pediatric infectious keratitis cases at UCLA Stein Eye Institute.

Methods : This is a retrospective chart review study. Patients 18 years and younger diagnosed with infectious keratitis with a positive microbiology culture between 2006-2019 were included. Demographics, microbiology results, and antibiotic susceptibilities were analyzed and reported.

Results : In total, 20 patients were identified. Mean age of the patients was 11 years old (range: 0 to 18) with 60% being ≥10 years old. Fifteen were female (75%), and 45% were of Hispanic/Latino origin. Most patients (n=14) presented between June and November. Both eyes were affected equally.
26 microorganisms were reported from 20 corneal cultures. Among them, bacteria was found in 92%, with one isolate (4%) each of fungi (Candida parapsilosis) and virus (HerpesSimplex). The most common bacterial isolates was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (23%). Among Gram-positive group (n=13), Staphylococcus infections were the most prevalent (n=5): four Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, and one methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Only 19% of Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole, and 8% susceptible to Erythromycin. However, all Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to Vancomycin. Among the Gram-negative bacteria (n=11), six were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and three were Moraxella. 82% of Gram-negative bacteria were susceptible to Gentamicin, 64% to Ciprofloxacin, and 55% to Ceftazidime. Pseudomonas isolates in the cohort were highly sensitive to Gentamicin (100%) and Ciprofloxacin (83%), and moderately sensitive to tobramycin (67%) and ceftazidime (67%).

Conclusions : Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common organism responsible for pediatric microbial keratitis cases and was highly susceptible to gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Empiric therapies with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or erythromycin may be insufficient for Gram-positive antimicrobial coverage in children, and clinicians should consider the addition of vancomycin with tobramycin or gentamicin. Empiric coverage with tobramycin and gentamicin suggested for Pseudomonas and Gram-negative infections.

This abstract was presented at the 2023 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in New Orleans, LA, April 23-27, 2023.

 

Antibiotic susceptibility and resistance trends for Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates

Antibiotic susceptibility and resistance trends for Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates

 

Antibiotic susceptibility and resistance trends for Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms

Antibiotic susceptibility and resistance trends for Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms

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