June 2023
Volume 64, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2023
Retina resuscitation following death
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nairouz Farah
    Life Sciences School of Optometry and Vision Science, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel
    Bar Ilan Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (BINA), Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel
  • Efrat Simon
    The Leslie & Susan Gonda (Goldschmied) brain research center, Bar Ilan, Ramat Gan, Israel
  • Yossi Mandel
    Life Sciences School of Optometry and Vision Science, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel
    Bar Ilan Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (BINA), Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Nairouz Farah None; Efrat Simon None; Yossi Mandel None
  • Footnotes
    Support  European Research council starting grant number 755748
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2023, Vol.64, 5064. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Nairouz Farah, Efrat Simon, Yossi Mandel; Retina resuscitation following death. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2023;64(8):5064.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To date, it is widely believed that human neural tissues in general and in particular retinal neurons, lose their functionality rapidly following death or prolonged ischemia. Recent publications have rekindled the hope that indeed light signalling in the retina can be revived following prolonged ischemia periods. Here we extensively dissect the several aspects of retinal cells function following prolonged ischemia and resuscitation not previously reported on.

Methods : The isolated retina of Long Evans Rats (Wild type) served as a model for the investigation of the effect of enucleation (beginning of ischemia) to re-oxygenation time on the responses of the various retinal cells. Towards this end, the eyeball was enucleated and placed in unoxygenated Ringer's for various time durations (T=0, T=15, T=30min). The retina was then isolated in oxygenated Ringer's solution and mounted on a Multi-Electrode-Array with the RGCs facing the electrodes. The effect of ischemia on several features of responses induced by 1sec flashes were investigated, namely: the number of active RGCs, the firing rate of the RGCs, the various properties of the their receptive field, and the amplitude of the various components of the electroretinogram.

Results : Retinal response to light was completely abolished following an ischemic time of 20 min with the main exciting observation that retinal function can be rescued by re-oxygenation even following a long ischemic time of up to 30 min. Notwithstanding the successful resuscitation, the recovered ON-response ERG amplitude gradually decreased with increasing ischemia time (up to 2-fold) whereas the OFF-response decreased to a lesser extent. Moreover, the viability of the RGCs following resuscitation decreased with increasing ischemia time as inferred by the decrease in firing rate (up to 3-fold).

Conclusions : We introduce here a robust in-vitro model for the investigation of various interventions aimed at preservation of neural tissue during ischemia. These results offer hope for the resuscitation of retinal or other neural tissue even after prolonged ischemia times.

This abstract was presented at the 2023 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in New Orleans, LA, April 23-27, 2023.

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